Factory Feedback

Young writers (aged 7-17)

Get Your Start as a Professional Writer

Story Factory is seeking young writers (aged 7-17) who love writing and have something to say to submit their writing for publication for our newest program – Factory Feedback.

This program is designed to support, champion and amplify the voices of the brilliant young people of Australia.

We will work with you to edit and develop your writing (both fiction and non-fiction) and then publish successful submissions on our website, as well as pay a small honorarium for your work.

We’re looking for shorter pieces suitable for publishing online on our website. We’d love to read your three-volume novel but it’s a bit tricky to publish online so we may suggest publishing an extract of longer work submitted. Up to 1000 words is a good fit, as a guideline.

We’ll ask for your name, age, address and school to check your eligibility for this program as part of the application process.

Factory Feedback  is our vote of confidence in the voices of young people.

@SydneyStoryFactory on Instagram

Are you looking for a way to make a difference in 2022, all from the comfort of your home?  In the new year we'll have more flexible volunteering opportunities available via Zoom. By becoming a Story Factory Digital Tutor in the new year, you’ll be able to help our primary students find their voice and share their stories. 
Find out more on our website: 
https://www.storyfactory.org.au/volunteer
Parramatta’s Female Factory Institutions Precinct, tucked into a particularly picturesque corner of Parramatta, is a place rich in history and memory. It’s a history that our program this year connected with - inviting students to consider the living traces of that history around them.  The results we collected into an especially beautiful publication, available now in our bookstore, featuring full colour art prints and poems created by our students.  Buy at https://shop.storyfactory.org.au/
The class of 2021! These miraculous young people, in the midst of disrupted learning and all the stress of 2021, somehow have written a novella or poetry chapbook as part of our Year of Poetry and Year of the Novella year-long programs.  Their words are as beautiful, moving, funny and wise and they are. We actually couldn’t be more proud.  Today we celebrate them and their manifold achievements.
We're thrilled to share that with the support of Clarity Pharmaceuticals we are recruiting a dedicated Indigenous Storyteller to deliver high- impact, term-length writing programs supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island young people  Clarity Pharmaceuticals Executive Chairman, Dr Alan Taylor, said he was excited to support Story Factory after growing up in community housing in the Redfern area.  ‘My grandparents, after immigrating from Europe after the war, were some of the first people to move into the McKell housing commission units in the early 1960s and lived there until the 90s. And my earliest memories as a child were living on the 14th floor of the Daniel Solander building in the Waterloo Housing Complex. This experience has given me a unique understanding of the area compared to many of my peers, especially of some of the difficulties some children face through no fault of their own, whether it is a lack of resources, or not knowing where opportunities lie.'  READ MORE: https://www.storyfactory.org.au/local-kid-gives-back-to-his-community/

Factory Feedback was created with, and generously supported by, the Dusseldorp Forum.

Program sponsor logo

Stories from this Program

Cats in the Mansion by Jemma

By Jemma, Year 6

One Day there was a ragdoll cat named Rachel. She lived in a big mansion! Her owners were lovely and nice, but one day they got a male cat named...

Untitled by Henry

By Henry, Year 9

In the beginning, the only thing in the whole galaxy was just an empty black void. The first primordial god was Chaos – a murky mist made up of all...

Medieval Life by Alex

By Alex, Year 9

Denos lived in the late 1400’s as a blacksmith apprentice working every day to make money for his family, it was a horrific time to live. Everything was different, it...

Untitled by Zakaria

By Zakaria, Year 10

“What just happened, where did everybody go.” he looks around and tries to piece up what just happened, Then it hits him hard on the face like a bug getting...

Young Breezy by Francis

By Francis, Year 10

Early morning, the sky was shining, I found a key made of gold on my room door. It had an attractive part that was shaped like a “K”. I shoved...

The Shadow’s On My Wall by Georgia

By Georgia, Year 5

Chapter 1 The closet. “T-the curtains swayed letting the glistening moon shine into my room, I-I awoke noticing a sh-shadow slowly fade into my closet,” Stumbled Lia facing Mia with...

The Missing Socks by Jamara

By Jamara, Year 5

Once upon time there was 1 pair of socks on an old stinky rotten foot. One day they got washed. But when they were washed an old man opened the...

TRANSCENDENCE by Lauren

By Lauren, Year 10

amidst the tranquil sea,  through the dim forested trees,  over the fringe where the rocky mountain ranges are,  lies a  tall ugly  weed from afar.   a weed with extending...

PITTER PATTER by Lauren

By Lauren, Year 10

“HEY COME BACK!”  His whimpering cries mimicked the increasingly tempestuous rain as the bitterness of his face slowly etched into a desolate, wavering frown. I slightly tilted my head, squinting...

My Nightmare Dress by Nancy

By Nancy, Year 7

Once a lady was lying down in her comfortable bed and then she remembered a very embarrassing moment which was when she was in a wedding and she and another...

Broken by Mya

By Mya, Year 10

She broke me She didn’t even have to touch me Her weapons were words, sharpened with cruelty  Like a knife, her cuts stung Like a trained assassin, she knew where...

The girl that never wore red by Natalie

By Natalie, Year 6

Once there lived a girl named Kathy, who wore all sorts of colours besides red. Kathy never once in her life wore red. People thought it might be genetics but...

the sanctuary of tomorrow by Rumaysa

By Rumaysa, Stage 4

so gentle it seemed, and if there was a time for peace as soft and light as cotton ‘twas now  when the sunlight split the thick dark clouds and time...

Why children must do house work

By Chioma, Year 5

Parents, do you think your children are starting to be lazy? Well an easy suggestion to that is to make your child HAVE to do housework. Studies say that 94%...

The Secret by Chioma

By Chioma, Year 5

RIIIIING! My alarm rang. It was 12am straight so I wondered what was going on. When I tried to get out of my bed, all of a sudden, my floors...

@SydneyStoryFactory on Instagram

Are you looking for a way to make a difference in 2022, all from the comfort of your home?  In the new year we'll have more flexible volunteering opportunities available via Zoom. By becoming a Story Factory Digital Tutor in the new year, you’ll be able to help our primary students find their voice and share their stories. 
Find out more on our website: 
https://www.storyfactory.org.au/volunteer
Parramatta’s Female Factory Institutions Precinct, tucked into a particularly picturesque corner of Parramatta, is a place rich in history and memory. It’s a history that our program this year connected with - inviting students to consider the living traces of that history around them.  The results we collected into an especially beautiful publication, available now in our bookstore, featuring full colour art prints and poems created by our students.  Buy at https://shop.storyfactory.org.au/
The class of 2021! These miraculous young people, in the midst of disrupted learning and all the stress of 2021, somehow have written a novella or poetry chapbook as part of our Year of Poetry and Year of the Novella year-long programs.  Their words are as beautiful, moving, funny and wise and they are. We actually couldn’t be more proud.  Today we celebrate them and their manifold achievements.
We're thrilled to share that with the support of Clarity Pharmaceuticals we are recruiting a dedicated Indigenous Storyteller to deliver high- impact, term-length writing programs supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island young people  Clarity Pharmaceuticals Executive Chairman, Dr Alan Taylor, said he was excited to support Story Factory after growing up in community housing in the Redfern area.  ‘My grandparents, after immigrating from Europe after the war, were some of the first people to move into the McKell housing commission units in the early 1960s and lived there until the 90s. And my earliest memories as a child were living on the 14th floor of the Daniel Solander building in the Waterloo Housing Complex. This experience has given me a unique understanding of the area compared to many of my peers, especially of some of the difficulties some children face through no fault of their own, whether it is a lack of resources, or not knowing where opportunities lie.'  READ MORE: https://www.storyfactory.org.au/local-kid-gives-back-to-his-community/