Arden’s Speech

Readers and viewers and definitely positioned to accept a particular view/s in the relation to Arden’s speech. Her purpose of her speech is to speak up to the nation as a prime minister and to emphasise the conflict against racism. Arden does this to reinforce how we shouldn’t battle this alone as she wants us to fight as a whole collective/team. Arden has used multiple techniques such as inclusive language and the utilisation of multiple languages to intrigue and include her audience to get rid of racism as a whole. Arden spoke at the National Remembrance service in Christchurch, New Zealand to remember the 50 people that were the victims of the shooting. She emphasises the violence and hatred and how it should be gone forever as it is not welcome.  Arden has used inclusive language in “We cannot confront these issues alone, none of us can” to involve the audience and to remind the audience how they aren’t alone in the fight against racism. She wants the audience to work as a group, as a collective instead of by ourselves to get rid of racism forever. By using inclusive language, it is a call to action to make a change and for her audience to do it now. Inclusive language makes the audience feel a sense of inclusion and recognition that they’re important in the clearing of racism. Arden has also utilised Maori and Arabic language in “As-salaam Alaikum” to include her audience of New Zealand to reinforce how she comes in peace with her people. She does this to involve every single person in this step of change even if they speak another language. This makes the audience feel like they are a part of this change of racism. I hope the audience are able to take a positive view on Arden’s positive power for the change of the world. Thus, readers and viewers are certainly positioned to accept views as in Arden’s speech. Throughout her speech, Arden has used inclusive language and multiple languages to include her audience in the fight against racism.

 

These stories were written in our Factory Feedback program, which was created with, and generously supported by, the Dusseldorp Forum.